Date of Award

Fall 12-2016

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Education

First Advisor

Dr. Rhonda Bishop

Second Advisor

Dr. Steven Bishop

Third Advisor

Dr. Sherry DeVore

Abstract

Games contribute to the whole-person, academic, and career development of collegeaged individuals (Alderman, 2015). However, many higher-education institutions do not sponsor gaming as a collegiate extracurricular activity, thereby possibly eliminating the opportunity of an all-inclusive environment (Alderman, 2015). To elucidate the problem, Astin and Antonio’s (2012) I-E-O model was engaged as conceptual framework for college-aged individuals’ perception of Magic the Gathering’s role in their whole-person, academic, and career development. The purpose of the study was to employ Magic the Gathering as the input; higher-education institutions as the environment; and wholeperson, academic, and career development as the outcome. Descriptive survey data were gathered regarding college-aged individuals’ perception of Magic the Gathering’s role in whole-person, academic, and career development. Since this study is the first of its kind, a survey was an appropriate instrument for the research (Creswell, 2013). The sample to participate in the survey were college-aged individuals from North America and Europe who played Magic the Gathering. After an in-depth analysis by means of quantitative methods, descriptive statistics were used to determine college-aged individuals perceived Magic the Gathering plays somewhat of a role in their whole-person development. Furthermore, by analyzing the descriptive statistics, it was found that college-aged individuals perceived Magic the Gathering plays somewhat of a role in their academic development. Lastly, per the descriptive analysis taken through the survey, college-aged individuals perceived Magic the Gathering played very little of a role in their career development.

Share

COinS