Date of Award

Fall 11-2014

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Education

First Advisor

Dr. Shane Williamson

Second Advisor

Dr. John Oldani

Third Advisor

Dr. John Henschke

Abstract

With healthcare moving rapidly toward interprofessional expectations, this study examined the perceptions of a particular population of students pursuing a degree in the healthcare field. Pharmacy students attending a free-standing pharmacy institution were interviewed over the course of the 2012 – 2013 academic year. Interviews were conducted before, during, and after the students engaged in collaborative coursework with students from a variety of health care majors attending a nearby institution. The results demonstrated the positive impact exposure to peer students pursuing degrees in health care fields can have. Results of the interview process highlighted the impact intentional interaction with a variety of students (i.e. medical, nursing, social work, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and physician assistant students) had for the students at the free-standing pharmacy institution. Results also demonstrated an increase in the perceived value of collaboration with other health care professionals. Additionally, results highlighted the importance of respect and communication as active components of interprofessional collaborations. Study participants grew in their understanding of their own role in the field of healthcare. Lastly, the depth of participants’ understanding of optimal patient care grew over the course of the intentional interaction during the academic year. Along with presenting and analyzing the results of the interview process, this document makes suggestions regarding practical application of said results to the academic curriculum at an institution granting only a pharmacy degree.

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