Date of Award

Spring 4-2018

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Education

First Advisor

Dr. John D. Long

Second Advisor

Dr. Jackie Ramsey

Third Advisor

Dr. Kevin Winslow

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to complete a mixed-methods comparative analysis of firstgeneration and non-first-generation students in the Midwest to determine potential differences between students’ college satisfaction, retention factors, college selection, college experience, and deciding factors on attending college at private, public, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The Primary Researcher believed that a students’ classifications (first-generation or non-first-generation) and the type of university that they chose to attend would yield different results in their overall college experiences. The Researcher conducted the study in different settings and did not compare by the type of university or the type of students who attended the universities. The previous research was conducted in different regions. The Primary Researcher was not able to find extensive then current research on first-generation and non-first-generation students in the Midwest. The results found did not show that being a first-generation or a non-first-generation student at a Historically Black College and University, public, or private university made a difference. The Primary Researcher found that overall, first-generation students had a more positive perception of their college experience than their non-first-generation peers.

Share

COinS